NZ Government Announces Desktop as a Service

Exciting news (for me anyway)! Last Friday, November 1 2013, the New Zealand Government Chief Information Officer (Colin MacDonald, Chief Executive of the Department of Internal Affairs) announced that the New Zealand government had negotiated contracts for the supply of Desktop as a Service (DaaS). 

The service provides both virtual desktops (hosted and managed by vendors) and management of traditional desktops, along with application packaging and delivery services.

To quote the press release:

Agencies can focus on creating more services that customers want and expect, rather than having to worry about owning, operating and maintaining large amounts of ICT infrastructure

As lead architect on the DaaS procurement, this is something I’m very proud of, and am excited to see made available. While it won’t massively change the world, I hope that it will contribute to making New Zealand government departments more efficient and effective.

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2 Comments to “NZ Government Announces Desktop as a Service”

  1. Well, what can I say? It only took then about 15 years after the technology became viable. Who said the wheels of government turn slowly? Taranaki District health Board put in similar infrastructure in 1991 and then Capital and Coast DHB saw the benefits and did the same, eventually outsourcing the whole lot (with TDHB) to HIQ Ltd.

    That said there are still an awful lot of large private enterprise It shops who insist on providing in-house IT and as a result lack the capacity to support the business in the real meaty stuff…. innovation using technology.

    ….Andre

    • Hi Andre,

      This isn’t quite your old style published applications – virtual desktops in a viable enterprise sense have only been around for a few years. The important thing though, as you’ve picked up, is allowing these organisations to focus on what is important – delivering services to New Zealanders. This DaaS allows them to do that, while taking advantage of the latest in end user computing technology and desktop management.

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